Monday, January 21, 2013

Ideological Jew-hatred: the great cover-up

 This Hitler quote implying the genocide of the Jews did not go far enough got almost 2,000 'likes' on the Palestine News Facebook Page.

 The western media have been embarrassed into exposing Egyptian President Morsi' s Jew-hatred. At the same time, they have chosen to ignore controversial remarks by Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas. Lyn Julius tries to explain why the West fails to take Arab-Islamist ideological hate speech seriously  in The Times of Israel:

Readers of the New York Times awoke last week to hard evidence that President Morsi of Egypt was an antisemite. (So did readers of the Times of London, Deutsche Welle, the Huffington Post, the BBC website and just about every major news medium.)

In a TV interview recorded in 2010, the President, who heads the Muslim Brotherhood Freedom and Justice party, was heard to utter various slurs against the Jewish people, quoting Koranic suras calling Jews ‘descendants of apes and pigs’.

Although Morsi’s 2010 rant has only just been released, the media had to be embarrassed into exposing it.   The Egyptian president’s antisemitism may have come as a shock because the western press and media rarely report incitement by Arab press and politicians. Once the cat was out of the bag, Morsi’s outburst was duly condemned both by the media and the US government.

But another remark this month, by another Arab leader, received next to no coverage at all: Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas told a Fatah rally that the wartime Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin al-Husseini, was his hero.

The Palestinian Mufti, a leading Arab figure,  was a staunch ally of Hitler, spending the years between 1941 and 1945 in Berlin. He actively collaborated with the Nazis in their goal of exterminating the Jews.  Abbas declared that the Mufti was” a great man whose ways should be emulated by all PA Arabs, and was worthy of great praise.”

The media silence has been deafening. Almost no western reporters picked up on Abbas’s controversial rhetoric.

Why?

*Because westerners want so badly to believe that these leaders are moderates they can do business with.  President Morsi, we were reminded, was pragmatic enough to broker a truce in Gaza between Hamas and Israel. Abbas is Israel’s ‘moderate’ peace partner.

*Because ‘the racism of low expectations’ does not demand better behaviour of ‘people of colour’:  only ‘man bites dog’ stories are newsworthy.

*Because the West habitually reverses cause and effect in its coverage of the conflict – Arab actions are understandable  reactions to ‘Israeli aggression’.

*Because the Palestinians have managed to deceive liberal opinion by cloaking their genocidal rhetoric in the claims of a ‘just cause’.

The media are colluding in a cover-up of the three-way axis between Nazis, the Mufti and the Muslim Brotherhood.

The Palestinian national movement was founded by the MuftiAfter WW2  Haj Amin al-Husseini was appointed head of the Muslim Brotherhood in Palestine. His legacy of Nazi-inspired eliminationist Jew-hatred is alive and well not just among the Palestinians, but across the Arab world.
But the fascism inherent in the pronouncements of Morsi and Abbas is the key to understanding why there is still an Arab-Muslim conflict against Israel. Such fascism the Western media is loath to reveal.

As Sky TV‘s Tim Marshall puts it: “in Europe, when Europeans say things such as expressed above, we recognise them as ‘Fascistic’. When expressed by people in some other parts of the globe we appear frightened to call things what they are.”

Why is the West frightened to condemn fascism in ‘people of colour’? Is it because  the West sees itself guilty of worse crimes against them – colonialism and imperialism?

It is essential to report what Mahmoud Abbas says because the Palestinian Authority leader  considers himself as the heir to the Mufti’s struggle to liberate Palestine from the Jews. And he has plenty of support: an apparent Hitler quote implying that the genocide of the Jews did not go far enough garnered nearly 2,000 ‘likes’ on the Facebook ‘Palestine News’ page.

The West is in danger of over-rating these two leaders’ pragmatism. Both the PA and the Muslim Brotherhood have embraced Jew-hatred as ideology.

8 comments:

Levana said...

The two pogroms at the Jewish quarter of Cairo in June and September 1948, were clearly made by the Egyptian Brotherhood, killing more than 70 Jews, with some 100 Jews wounded. It was reported then in the New-York Times and the Egyptian AL-AHRAM newspaper. On that time already,the Moslem Brotherhood disturbed the normal life in Egypt, and in December 1948 they murdered Nokrashi Pasha, then Prime Minister of the kingdom of Egypt. In return, the head of the Moslem Brotherhood, Hassan el-Banna has been killed and any activity of the Moslem Brotherhood became illegal in Egypt. Only then, a relatively lull took place for the Jews in Egypt, until 1956 of course.
Among other things, the Moslem Brotherhood claimed in 1948, that the Status of Dhimmis should be settled again on the Jews living in Egypt. But why going so far, the DOSTOUR (Egyptian Laws) confirmed lately in Egypt - against the will of million of Egyptians living in Egypt - includes on paragraph 3, a clear discrimination between Muslim and non-Muslim citizens in Egypt.
What could we expect then, from a President of a country where discrimination between citizens of other religions IS THE LAW ?
Levana

Anonymous said...

And that is why dear Levana, we are no longer there. baruch Hashem.
We are now living in democratic countries that outlaw descrilination against Jews.Merci mon Dieu
sultana

Anonymous said...

It's the racism of low expectations of "Arabs" and an entirely different ones for Jews. Arabs are excused for Jew hatred because 20% of Mandatory Palestine was partitioned to create a Jewish homeland that encompassed numerous holy sites, and Jews, well, we're just supposed to be reconciled to being stateless cosmopolitans, welcome only when it suits the ruling class of a particular state, because unlike the Christians and Muslims, we had no great armies to muster to protect us in our homeland after the fall of the Roman Empire.

As regards Abbas in particular, not only did he "earn" a PHd for a piece of Holocaust denial, he hails from Safed, a city that had a significant Jewish presence up until the 1830s when a band of Druze thieves attacked the Jewish community and caused them to flee, facts of which he is no doubt aware.

Eliyahu m'Tsiyon said...

Anon, I agree with your first paragraph. But as regards Safed, not quite. About 1831, Muhammad Ali of Egypt, conquered Israel and today's Syria & Lebanon from the Ottoman Empire, although he supposedly stayed a loyal Ottoman subject and vassal [go figure!]. In 1834, there was a Muslim uprising in the country during which --I believe-- the Druze attack and plundering of Jews in Safed took place. However, Jews were still a significant presence in the town until at least 1838 when an earthquake killed 2,000 Jews in Safed. By 1839, many of the survivors had migrated to Jerusalem, thus making Jews the largest single ethno-religious group in the Yerushalayim. Hence, the Jews were a plurality there by 1839, although not yet an absolute majority until the 1850s, apparently by 1853 [according to Cesar Famin, French diplomat & historian].
http://ziontruth.blogspot.co.il/2006/03/jewish-majority-in-jerusalem-in-1853.html

Anonymous said...

.




. I have bowed out of the local interfaith Holocaust service, because it was a custom to include Hatikvah at the end, but now some Christian groups object as they support the Palestinians and the Muslim Imams would either sit or leave during the Hatikvah. Perhaps interfaith Holocaust programs no longer make sense, at least to me. I do not need the stress of seeing disrespect being afforded to Israel and nor do I wish to compromise by leaving Hatikvah out. This is a personal choice and I DO NOT ADVOCATE ANYONE NOT PARTICIPATING IN ANY INTERFAITH HOLOCAUST SERVICE. I INTRODUCED INTERFAITH HOLOCAUST SERVICES IN 1974 AND WAS ONE OF THE FIRST IF NOT THE FIRST TO DO SO. Perhaps it should be called INTERFAITH GENOCIDE SERVICE OR INTERFAITH DAY FOR VICTIMS OF PERSECUTION. IF I was a Palestinian or a Muslim , I WOULD FEEL AS THEY DO. BUT I AM A JEW AND A ZIONIST. This was a difficult decision for me based on personal principle. The interfaith Holocaust memorials started as well intentioned way for the Jewish people and other groups to pause and reflect on man's capacity to perpetuate unbelievable cruelty against his fellow and to commiserate as a group and others, with the Jews and hopefully prevent this nightmare from reoccurring. Over the years it was understandably modified to include other victims of genocidal mass killings, though these mass killings were not really analogous, as the Nazis were obsessed at not just killing Jews as a competing group, but Hitler desired to eliminate our creed and it's pervasive influence on humanity. As a result of extremist Muslim participation and twisted liberalism, this is morphing into a twisted canard where Israel is being blamed for perpetuating ethnic killings against the Palestinians as the Jews were slaughtered by the Nazis. One can understand the Islamo-Nazis belief system with a quote from the Talmud. We do not see things as they are. We see them as we are. RABBI DR. BERNHARD ROSENBERG, CHILD OF Holocaust survivors and a refugee born in a D.P. camp

bataween said...

Thank you for your very moving comment. You are not alone in remarking that Interfaith dialogue has been polticised, perverted and turned against its Jewish victims.

Readers in London, please come along to the debate between leading Jewish, Muslim and Christian figures INTERFAITH DIALOGUE: DOES IT WORK? on 6th February at Friends' House in Euston Road. www.harif.org

Anonymous said...

Rabbi Chaim Vital wrote in the 16th Century, "At the End of Days, Israel is destined to experience the Ishmaelite exile. This fifth and last exile will be the most difficult of all. It is the exile of Ishmael, who is called 'pe're adam,' a wild man." Be strong, cling to your faith and we will see Moshiach wipe all this away. As we sing in Shir Hamaahlot (Psalm 126), we were like dreamers, meaning before our redemption, now in the end times. RABBI DR. BERNHARD ROSENBERG

Anonymous said...


Rabbi’s reversal riles Shoa memorial event

Organizers to vote on restoring ‘Hatikva’ to interfaith program


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Rabbi Bernhard Rosenberg says omitting the Israeli anthem from the Holocaust commemoration would be “giving in to the current atmosphere of anti-Semitism.”